Corporate Games PDF Print E-mail
Last Updated on Tuesday, 29/12/2009, 12:12

corporate_gamesAll managers know that to ensure efficient outputs to a meeting (whether a management meeting, a corporate seminar, a training or any other type of meeting), passive listening should be limited to the absolute minimum, and replaced with opportunities to dialogue, to move around and to otherwise be active in a way or another whenever possible. The “fun” dimension is also very important and significantly improves the quality of the meeting, both in terms of factual outputs and in the perception of participants. Prasena shares with you some of the techniques that give life to meetings and training sessions, and offers corporate games that may be used to support management meetings and workshops as well as training sessions.

Did you know about…?

The “jumping rabbit” technique
This technique applies when you want a group of people (10-25) to all conduct the same set of exercises or give feedback on the same set of questions. The group is too large to ensure that each member will participate if it is split into small teams, but to ask every team to conduct all exercises or to review all questions and then to consolidate outputs will take too long.

corporate_games_2The “jumping rabbit” consists in setting 3-5 stations, each with one exercise or one question. Participants are asked to form as many teams as there are stations. Each team is assigned to a station and the work starts. After a set period of 5-20 minutes, the teams turn and go to the next stations; they are invited to review what has been done by their predecessors and build on it (add, edit, continue). The process is repeated as many times as there are stations, so that each team has the opportunity to work on each station for one period. Completed results at each station are then reviewed and commented by the group.

corporate_games_3The faster the funnier! When periods are 5 minutes only, participants, under pressure (but not stressed), start laughing while trying to find something to say within such a short time. They exercise less control over their ideas and get more creative. But you need to make sure, depending on the exercise’s nature and topic, that there is reasonable time to produce outputs.

The “corporate speed-dating” technique

corporate_games_4This technique applies when you want a group of people (10-50) to know each other better and value both their diversity and commonalities, while working on an issue that affects all of them.

“Corporate speed-dating” consists in first presenting the issue to the group. Roles may or may not be distributed. Participants are given a short time to individually prepare their own viewpoint and may be invited to present it to all; then, they are invited to mingle during a time, either freely (they have 20 minutes to meet everybody), or by pairs (they have 3 minutes per session and then must move on to another person). Their objective is to identify the person or persons with whom they would like to, or should, associate by reference to the issue at hand. Once pairs (or groups) are formed, each one is invited to explain what makes them a group.

corporate_games_3This exercise is particularly interesting when talking about competencies and/or values. For example, if the company has not yet clarified its values (or would like to update them), the management team may be invited to explore the set of values that, according to them, best support the company’s competitiveness.

The “six thinking hats” technique

This technique, designed by Dr. Edward de Bono, applies when a team of people meets to solve a problem, to design a strategy or a policy, or to evaluate something or someone. Time is short and outputs must be concrete. For this meeting to be efficient, all participants must focus, actively contribute and ensure that all aspects of the topic are covered before decision is taken.

corporate_games_5The “six thinking hats” are roles allocated to the meeting’s participants (participants may actually wear real colored hats). The “white hat” is given to the participant(s) that will always ask for, and refer to, facts and figures. The “red hat” will react instinctively and express emotional feelings. The “black hat” will use logic to seek, find and demonstrate flaws, obstacles, problems. The “yellow hat” will strive to find the benefits, the good sides, and to ensure harmony. The “green hat” will investigate, find new ideas, provoke, and push the thinking further. The “blue hat” will consider all facets and see the pig picture, ensure that meeting’s objectives are set and achieved.

corporate_games_3What makes it fun is the way these hats are allocated. For example, participants may have the choice of a hat and keep it for the duration of the meeting (in which case they must strive to retain their role throughout). Alternatively, the hats may change heads when participants want to take on a role. The blue hat however should remain on a single head, possibly a facilitator.

Prasena’s Corporate Games

corporate_games_who_does_whatWho Does What?
Prasena private edition
2009
English with possible multilingual customization
This game is played with colored tags – each tag shows a responsibility, the color indicates the management area to which the responsibility belongs, and icons are used to add information about the scope of responsibility. The objective is to allocate these responsibilities to positions in the most efficient and cost-effective way. This game can be played with real cases or with case studies prepared by Prasena. Tags are available for the HR, ICT and Knowledge management functions, but it is possible to design entirely customized sets of tags in any language, for any function up to an entire real or fictive organization.


corporate_games_who_needs_whatWho Needs What?
Prasena private edition
2009
English with possible multilingual customization
This game is played with colored tags – each tag shows a competency, the color indicates the competency type, and icons are used to add information about the level of competency. The objective is to identify which position requires which competency (note: this game is best played as a follow-up to “Who Does What?”). This game can be played with real cases or with case studies prepared by Prasena. More than 300 tags are available, but it is possible to design entirely customized sets of tags in any language, for any technical area, function or behavior, up to the entire competencies dictionary of a real or fictive organization.

corporate_games_who_knows_whatWho Knows What?
Prasena private edition
2009
English with possible multilingual customization
This game is played with colored tags – each tag shows a competency, the color indicates the competency type, and icons are used to add information about the level of competency. The objective is to identify the competencies demonstrated by an employee or a candidate (note: this game is best played as a follow-up to “Who Needs What?”). This game can be played with real cases or with case studies prepared by Prasena. More than 300 tags are available, but it is possible to design entirely customized sets of tags in any language, for any technical area, function or behavior, up to the entire competencies dictionary of a real or fictive organization.

corporate_games_who_learns_whatWho Learns What?
Prasena private edition
2009
English with possible multilingual customization
This game is played with colored tags – each tag shows a learning experience, the color indicates the type of experience, and icons are used to add information about the targeted level of competency. The objective is to design a program that can address a person’s orientation, catch-up, skills update, individual development and/or mindset update needs (note: this game is best played as a follow-up to “Who Knows What?”). This game can be played with real cases or with case studies prepared by Prasena. More than 150 tags are available, but it is possible to design entirely customized sets of tags in any language, up to the entire learning-ware dictionary of a real or fictive organization.